Jordan Travels West Asia

Everything you need to know about Jordan Pass

Jordan Pass is a digital document issued by Jordan’s Ministry of Tourism that provides hassle-free entry to over 40 tourist spots. Additionally, it also waives visa charges of 40 Jordanian dinars (JD) [approx – 56.43$ / 4700INR] for a minimum stay of 3 nights.

If you have done some preliminary research for your Jordan trip you would already know this. But is it worth your money? Let me break down its benefits, how to get it and how much I saved with it so you can make the right decision for you. 

Types of Jordan Pass

Pass TypeWandererExplorerExpert
Price70 JD75 JD80 JD
Difference1 day visit to Petra2 consecutive visit days to Petra3 consecutive visit days to Petra
Al-Khazneh / Treasury, Petra.
Treasury, Petra

The Pass makes visa easy

The Jordan Pass is quite literally your entry ticket to Jordan. And with it, you do not have to pay for a visa separately.

If you are from a country that can apply for an e-visa to Jordan, you can claim the visa fee waiver right in the e-visa application process. Your e-visa form will have an option to enter the pass number and once you do that, the fees automatically get waived. 

Important note – If you are applying for an e-visa, get your Jordan Pass before claiming the waiver. If you buy your e-visa before buying the pass, you cannot claim the waiver and as a result end up spending way more than necessary. 

I wasn’t able to do this e-visa process due to a technical error. But Indians can get visa on arrival. So all I had to do was carry my Jordan Pass to the immigration and I got the visa stamped into my passport without having to pay any fees. 

Where and how to buy the Jordan Pass?

You can get the Jordan Pass from the official website – https://jordanpass.jo/. The process is pretty straightforward. Once you type in the required details and pay the fee, your printable Jordan pass is emailed to you immediately. 

Is it worth buying?

If you plan to visit Petra (one of the new seven wonders of the world) on your trip and plan on staying in Jordan for more than 3 nights, buying the Jordan pass is definitely worth it. Because buying a one-day pass to Petra alone costs 50 JD and the visa would be 40 JD which comes to 90 JD. 

On the other hand, the Jordan pass for a single day Petra visit costs 70 JD and waives off your visa fees. A savings of 20 JD (28.21$ / 2350INR) already. But I saved a lot more!

Roman Theatre, Amman.
Roman Theatre, Amman.

How much did I save with my Jordan Pass?

I bought the expert variant of the Jordan Pass (80 JD) to make sure I get to experience Petra to the fullest. But after being there, I believe 2 days are good enough to explore the place. 

An activity I did just because it was worth 20 JD and came free with the Pass was the Journey through 1916 train ride – a recreation of the Arab revolt in 1916 against the Ottoman Turks. I ended up missing most of the show thanks to the poor choice of seat but of the few glimpses I was able to catch, it was quite interesting. If you go for this, make sure you find a seat in the open carriage or a proper view towards the right side of the train. 

Now for the satisfying savings part: 

ActivityWith PassWithout Pass
Entry Fee for 2 Days in Petra0 JD55 JD
Visa0 JD40 JD
Entry Fee to Jerash Ruins0 JD8 JD
Entry Fee to Wadi Rum Protected Area0 JD7 JD
Journey Through 1916 – Train Ride 0 JD20 JD
Entry Fee to Roman Theatre in Amman0 JD2 JD
Entry Fee to Citadel in Amman0 JD2 JD
Entry Fee to Martius Church + Burnt Palace, Madaba Museum, Archeological Park0 JD3 JD
Entry Fee to Ajloun Castle0 JD3 JD
Total 140 JD 

So, my savings was: 140 – 80 (the cost of the pass) = 60 JD ( approx. $84.65 / INR 7077)

Additional Savings

I have to mention this because it saved me so much hassle and another 40 JD! 

My initial plan was to visit Jordan in October 2023 and I had bought my Pass and other tickets accordingly. However, due to the Israel-Gaza situation, I called off my trip without a proper future date in mind. 

Now, if it was a traditional tourist visa, it is valid only for 3 months. So, it would have expired and I would have had to purchase another visa for my March trip. Thankfully, the Jordan Pass was valid for a year which allowed me to visit in March 2024 without paying for a visa again. 

So, my total saving comes up to 60 + 40 = 100 JD ( approx. $141 / INR 11,796)

Which if you ask me is great! 

(Note: The Jordan pass is valid for a year from the date of purchase. And the pass is scanned at every attraction included in it, so carry a physical copy of the pass. Also, you can visit the attractions only once using your Jordan pass and the pass is valid for 14 days from the time of activation)

Wadi Rum Desert
Wadi Rum Desert

When should you not buy the Pass?

If you ask me, you don’t need to buy the Pass if:

  • Your trip to Jordan is less than 3 days in which case the Jordan Pass doesn’t include the visa waiver.
  • Petra is not on your itinerary. You can pay 40 JD for the visa and entry fees for other tourist spots. But do calculate in advance if the sites in your itinerary cost less than 30 JD. (So that the total is less than 70 JD – the lowest variant of Jordan pass)

These are the biggest expenses that get covered under the Pass. 

How much can you save on an average with Jordan Pass?

I spent 14 days in Jordan and took my time exploring places. But how much can you save if you are doing a shorter trip? 

A standard tourist itinerary, say for a week, includes 2 days in Amman with a visit to Jerash, 2 days in Petra, 1 day in Wadi Rum, and 2 days in Aqaba. Let’s do the calculation for this:

ActivityWith PassWithout Pass
Entry Fee for 2 Days in Petra0 JD55 JD
Visa0 JD40 JD
Entry Fee to Jerash Ruins0 JD8 JD
Entry Fee to Wadi Rum Protected Area0 JD7 JD
Entry Fee to Roman Theatre in Amman0 JD2 JD
Entry Fee to Citadel in Amman0 JD2 JD
Total 114 JD 

Considering Jordan Pass (explorer variant) for 2-day access to Petra costs 75 JD, one would save 114 – 75 = 39 JD (approx. $ 55/INR 5600)

Either way, it is safe to say that anyone travelling to and staying in Jordan for more than 3 nights and visiting Petra saves an amount upward of 20 JD (approx. $28.22/ INR 2359) with the Pass.

Can I buy Jordan pass at the airport?

No, you cannot buy the Jordan pass at the airport. The pass serves as a visa waiver but is not exactly a visa so you won’t find it in the airport. You can only buy it online through the official website. 

Do Indians get visa on arrival in Jordan?

Yes, Indians do get visa on arrival in Jordan. However, brace yourself for a not-so-smooth immigration process if you do not have a Western country multi-entry visa or resident permit (saying from personal experience and research).

Ajloun Castle, also included with Jordan Pass.
Ajloun Castle

What Jordan Pass includes?

Jordan Pass includes more than 40 attractions in the country. The major ones are:

  • Petra 
  • Wadi Rum  
  • Jerash 
  • Umm Qais
  • Citadel and Roman Theatre in Amman
  • Castles at Karak, Shobak, Ajloun, Aqaba. 
  • Journey through 1916

Also, buying the pass provides a discounted price of 8 JD (as against 12 JD) to Bethany beyond Jordan – the site believed to be the place where Jesus Christ was baptized by Saint John.

If you have any other doubts about the Pass or about planning your trip to Jordan, drop it in the comments. I will be happy to clarify it!

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Author

  • Sundaram Venkateshwaran

    Sundaram Venkateshwaran is an inquisitive learner who loves to understand places, people and cultures through his journeys. If being bombared with meaningful questions and having deep conversations is your thing, he is the person to grab a coffee with. Through his writing, he shares stories from his journeys and conversations that impacted him the most.

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Sundaram Venkateshwaran

Sundaram Venkateshwaran is an inquisitive learner who loves to understand places, people and cultures through his journeys. If being bombared with meaningful questions and having deep conversations is your thing, he is the person to grab a coffee with. Through his writing, he shares stories from his journeys and conversations that impacted him the most.

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